Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Animated paintings

Rino Stefano Tagliafierro created this video by taking old master paintings, separating elements into layers, and applying gentle movements with a digital animation program. 

Together with the music and audio FX track, the animations take on a strange, dreamy, and at times disturbing feeling. (Link to YouTube video)

It's amazing how compelling any movement is—it kind of overrides everything else about the picture, and gives a sense of the painting as a possible moment of a larger continuity. In places, the visuals are sensual and gruesome, but so are the old master paintings they're based on.
Thanks, Mel and Eric

7 comments:

Steve said...

Wow. Remarkable how many of the images were from Bouguereau. Seeing this will definitely alter my next trip to the Detroit Institute of Arts; some of those paintings will never seem the same. The music has a major role in the impact of this video. I used to do some video editing, creating a two hour "yearbook" of my students' year in our classroom. Changing the music underneath a visual sequence could completely transform the emotional impact of the images.

vlad74 said...

Everything become so real - people, places. Amazing video.

Willow's Quiet Corner said...

Wow! Great job! I wonder how long it took to do!

Shaun Stipick said...

The landscapes are wonderfully effective, at times specific assets appearing almost three-dimensional.

Since this topic is similar I will leave this here:

http://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/pdf/press/CarterPressRelease.pdf

here is a link to the movie:
http://www.nytimes.com/video/arts/100000002509245/transforming-still-life.html

I know I've seen this link on a blog, hopefully it wasn't this one, if only not to retread on previous subject matter. If so, my apologies.

Please humor this flight of fancy, I wonder what will happen the day when we can control fluid dynamics in real time (if it ever happens). It is fun to imagine, being able to create ever changing paintings in real time, where images go from heavy impastos to varnish slick, as the characters in the paintings change not only positions but their topographical characteristics.

Connie Nobbe said...

This was so cool to watch. It's exciting to see some life and movement being injected into these long-admired paintings.
Inspired by one of your previous posts about gif files, I did a step-by-step progression gif file with one of my paintings, and at the end, I made a candle flame begin to dance. It made me think about all the possibilities that one could do with animation of a painting. Of course, my little gif is nothing compared to this sophisticated animation you have shared, but it was fun to play with. Here is my blog link to it. http://connienobbe.blogspot.com/2013/11/september-on-red-velvet-comes-to-life.html

Nick Hendriks said...

This is neat! I think the landscapes were definitely the most successful. The animated characters felt ever so slightly Terry Gilliam-esque to me; not a bad thing, but somehow it jarred a bit with the content.
Either way, really cool to see some new life breathed into these already excellent works.

Sơn Phạm said...

cool!!! hạt điều mật ong